Small Twitter Victory

twvictoryWhile my tiny corner of the world is being loomed over by the type of room-shaking thunderstorms it rarely experiences, I did find a tiny ray of sunlight. MacManX on Twitter is finally mine, after spending the last five years trying to wrestle it from the clutches of a long-abandoned tech news account. I don’t know why it’s so important to me, but it always bothered my that it was just sitting there unused and unloved, while I had to use MacManXcom instead. Well, now it’s mine. Time to find some sort of tiny victory horn to blast, but probably no one will hear it over this thunder.

Changing usernames on Twitter is shockingly easy, it’s actually just another settings field. You type in a new username, it instantly displays if it’s available, and you save your settings. Your Tweets are transferred over, your Followers are transferred over, everything is transferred over. I was very impressed. The only negative point is that there is no way to redirect the old username. You have officially given it up for someone else to have, which I suppose is perfectly fair. One minute to change the username, one hour to find and change any links and integrations that are within my power to change, and another hour to take a black marker to my business cards (way too many business cards). A nearly five-year struggle was over in two hours.

Tweet From Your Blog

Are you tired of your Twitter client, or do you just want to turn your blog into your own social media hub? Well, now you can Tweet from your blog!

Yes, I did mention this briefly in my earlier Timepiece post, but I figured it was so cool that I had to mention it again.

If you have a WordPress.com or Jetpack-powered WordPress.org blog with Publicize enabled, posts with no title (typical of the Aside post format) will be sent to your Publicize connections (Twitter, Facebook, etc.) with a 100-character excerpt and a link to your post. Of course, you know what that means, but I’ll say it again anyway. You can now Tweet from your blog!

Any untitled post will send the excerpt via Publicize, along with a link to the post to bring the discussion back to your blog.

If you have a blog, feel free to try it today! If you don’t, there has never been a better time to own and control your own content, and to break your reliance on other social networks.

Your Blogging App is There for You

With the recent news about Twitter strictly enforcing token (user) limits against third-party clients, it’s important to remember that your blog still loves you.

When you post to your blog, the content is still your property, and you can use any blogging app without fear of artificial user limits or high prices due to limiting and confrontational business policies. Plus, most blogging platforms provide some way to automatically share your new posts on Twitter and other social networks, like Publicize for WordPress.com blogs and Jetpack for WordPress.org blogs.

In the world of mobile usage, I’m particularly fond of our mobile apps. If you’re looking for a third-party mobile app, I have heard great things about Poster, but haven’t tried it myself yet. All WordPress apps use the open XML-RPC protocol, which will never be closed or limited.

If you don’t have a blog yet, and don’t know where to turn to in this era of social networking turmoil, open a free WordPress.com blog today. If you want just a bit more control and don’t mind a few more responsibilities, try WordPress.org instead.

If you have a WordPress.com blog, it will remain online and your property as long as we’re still in business, and you can export your blog’s content at any time. If you have a WordPress.org blog, it will remain online and your property as long as you can keep it running. For both WordPress.com and WordPress.org users, our mobile apps will always be available free of charge.

I know that your blog and blogging app will never truly be a replacement for a Twitter client, but they do allow you to reach your audience (even via Twitter) without compromising content ownership, app usage, or other limiting policies.