Basic Privacy Tools

A few years ago, I wrote about security, privacy, and resetting the net. We’re still in very interesting times as far as that subject goes, and if you haven’t taken steps to protect your privacy, now might be a good time to reconsider that.

One of the easiest changes you can make is to use DuckDuckGo instead of a major search engine. DuckDuckGo doesn’t store your personal information and doesn’t track you, so using it instead of a major search engine is a great way to start cutting down on your digital footprint. Also, if you’re making the switch to DuckDuckGo, but still using Chrome (which is made by Google), now might be a great time to try Firefox instead.

While we’re talking about search engine tracking, you might as well put a stop to all of the other trackers too. If you’re already using Firefox, you can switch on already built-in tracking protection with their Test Pilot program (this can also be enabled manually by toggling privacy.trackingprotection.enabled to true under about:config). Try uBlock Origin for most other browsers, or for more control in Firefox, and try Firefox Focus for iOS devices.

For the communication end of things, consider switching to Signal for your messaging needs. Signal is fully encrypted end-to-end, so the only two people who can read the messages are the sender and recipient. For email, consider switching to ProtonMail, which is also fully encrypted, and hosted in privacy-friendly Switzerland.

Additionally, you’ll probably want a VPN to keep you safe, at least when you’re on public Wi-Fi. This is where things get a bit tricky. You’ll want to choose a VPN that either doesn’t log your activity, like TunnelBear, or one that’s not based in The Fourteen Eyes, like these. You’ll also want to make sure that your chosen VPN supports both your desktop and mobile devices. For added security in extreme situations, keep a copy of Tor Browser around (use Onion Browser for iOS devices and Orfox for Android devices).

These are just some basic steps to protect your privacy online. They’ll provide some layer of protection, but if you want to lock things down even further, visit Privacy Tools and PRISM Break.

If you want to do even more, please consider supporting an organization that will fight for your privacy, like the Electron Frontier Foundation and the American Civil Liberties Union.

Security, Privacy, and Resetting the Net

Accusations of online surveillance by government entities are rampant. By now, you have all seen or heard of at least one clandestine government program, like PRISM, designed to spy on citizens by circumventing what was once considered to be fundamental security.

The validity of these accusations and programs are in question, as would be expected. Is there really a threat? If so, is it really as bad as described? Are those spreading the accusations seeking only to undermine the stability of their governments? Are those defending their governments simply working for their governments or living in fear of them? I doubt we’ll ever know the truth, but why should we let that stop us from protecting ourselves regardless?

Today, over 12 thousand people joined together to reach over 12 million followers to Reset the Net by promoting security and privacy. Companies like WordPress.com are already promising better security by the end of the year, and you can protect yourself now by adopting the use of many security-focused apps and privacy-focused alternatives to popular web services, like using DuckDuckGo instead of Google. By making ourselves more secure users, we promote a more secure and private internet. Whether online surveillance by government entities truly exists or not, how could you say that a more secure and private internet is a bad thing?

Now, get out there and promote a more secure and private internet! Don’t underestimate the power of your voice online. Be the change you want to see in the world.